Its raining monarch…insults

As C. elegans researchers, it can be tough to share a department with folks that study a system as beloved as monarch butterflies. Yet, what C. elegans lack in charisma they make up for in hypothesis testing power. Nonetheless, sometimes it is important to hurl insults at butterfly researchers, quite literally.

Here is a picture of Jaap de Roode (monarch butterfly researcher) after the Morran lab dropped monarch insults (via parachute) onto him from two floors above. Jaap Prank

Here is one of my favorites (most can’t be repeated here):

Butterflies would be better if they were made out of actual butter.

 

Dr. Kim Hoang

Dr. Kim HoangGerardo/Morran lab student Kim Hoang successfully defended her Ph.D. She will begin an NSF funded postdoctoral fellowship with Kayla King (Oxford) and Tim Read (Emory) in March. Kim has done some really cool work on the establishment of beneficial host-microbial interactions using C. elegans as hosts. See our publications page for some of this work, and stay tuned for some very cool stuff to come!

Congrats Kim! Excellent work.

Science Saturday!

 

We ran our first Science Saturday camp last weekend. Kids and adults from the Edgewood neighborhood in Atlanta came out to learn about DNA, extract DNA from strawberries, and to see mutant worms. Oh yeah, we also ate lots of waffles (Thank you Waffle House)! Many thanks to the Morran lab crew for serving as “camp counselors” and to Edgewood Church for hosting the event. It is pretty cool to host a science camp at a church, and pastors Carrie and Nathan Dean were amazing collaborators. And finally thanks to NSF for the funds to make this happen.

Science Saturday part II will be 11/16 at Edgewood Church at 9am. We’ll be learning about heredity and natural selection. Also, there will be waffles!

New paper by Signe!

The first data chapter from Signe’s dissertation is now published. Congrats Signe!

In this paper, Signe finds that the dauer life stage can alter C. elegans interactions with parasites by inducing avoidance behavior and/or reducing host mortality rates, depending on the strain of C. elegans. On a broader scale, this project demonstrates that the host life stage can alter mechanisms of host defense and thus play a critical role in the outcome of host-parasite interactions.

sw1

Policy Memo Competition

Grad student Signe White and her teammates from the Emory Science Advocacy Network (EScAN) recently placed 3rd overall in a national science policy memo competition. The top policy memos were published in the Journal of Science Policy and Governance. Signe’s team focused on addressing high levels of PFAS chemicals in Georgia’s groundwater.

Great job Signe!

Emory EScAN Policy Memo

pQS%pHsqQyeuh5NnauSj5Q[1]

Signe (2nd from the left) and her team.